• Panadol 24 pack redesign

    This case history was influential in changing the medicine labelling regulations in Australia.


  • cover-regulating-info

    Governments and industry regulate a great deal of information that people use in daily life: product labelling, instructions, contracts, policies, letters, bills, forms, statements, web sites, highway signs, public information symbols; the list goes on…

    Medicines are information-dependent products. Without information, they can be dangerous, harmful, even lethal. According to the FDA (2013), citing an Institute of Medicine Report, medication errors are a significant public health concern that account for an estimated 7,000 deaths annually in the United States. The report cited labelling and packaging issues as the cause of 33% of all medication errors and 30% of fatalities from medication errors.

    With easily usable information, medicines can be safe, helpful, even life saving.

    This case history focuses on how we participated in creating regulations that led to easily usable information about medicines.


  • Designing information for people

    Edited by
    Robyn Penman
    & David Sless

    Reissued here for the first time as an ebook is the much cited CRI symposium proceedings that set the stage for 3 decades of achievement in information design in Australia and beyond.

    Written by international experts, this book will help you understand information design: the process of creating information which is accessible and usable.

    The authors share a common conviction that the information age will benefit us only if we can easily access and use the information we need. Through specific examples such as forms, instructions, publications, graphs, tables and computer interfaces, the authors share with you their experiences as designers and their thoughts on many aspects of information design.
    Preview


  • cover-IDandP

    The classic widely-cited case history that established CRI as an international leader in information design methods.

    It shows how specific information design methods can lead to massive productivity improvements in information intensive industries.

    It is as fresh and relevant today as it was when originally published in 1989, long before the current vogue in user-centred design. Many of its seminal insights are yet to be adopted by the mainstream user-centred design community.

    Read an extract here.

    Originally published as a CRI working paper, it was also published in Information Design Journal in 1990.

    Fisher, P. and Sless, D. (1990). Information design methods and productivity in the insurance industry. Information Design Journal, 6(2), pp 103-129.

  • cover-bm_cc_2009.3-summary

    Credit card statement usability around the world.

    This publication will be of value to consumer advocates, financial rgulators, students, and educators. It contains:

    • a full description of the research method used
    • summary tables of the results
    • a detailed discussion of the findings.

    Download a FREE overview.

    Our baseline measurement studies show whether or not everyday information is usable at an acceptable level.

    This study was done by volunteers around the world who think this work is important. We will publish details of our next studies in the CRI Newsletter. 

     If you would like to volunteer to be an investigator in any of our studies, please register to get our Newsletter where we will let you know when our next study will happen. 


  • Credit Card Statements: full report

    Credit card statement usability around the world.

    This version will be of value to professional information designers and credit card providers. It contains:

    • a full description of the research method used
    • detailed tables of the results
    • a detailed discussion of the findings
    • a full list of the questions participants were asked.

    Download a FREE overview.

    Our baseline measurement studies show whether or not everyday information is usable at an acceptable level.

    This study was done by volunteers around the world who think this work is important. We will publish details of our next studies in the CRI Newsletter. 

     If you would like to volunteer to be an investigator in any of our studies, please subscribe to our Newsletter.  


  • Credit Card Statements: quick overview

    Credit card statement usability around the world.

    Our baseline measurement studies show whether or not everyday information is usable at an acceptable level.

    This study was done by volunteers around the world who think this work is important. We will publish details of our next studies in the CRI Newsletter. 

     If you would like to volunteer to be an investigator in any of our studies, please subscribe to our Newsletter.  


  • Designing better medicine labelling

    This study is about methods for improving labelling for over-the-counter (OTC) medicines so that they can be easily accessed and used by consumers.

    It was commissioned as part of a Federal Government initiative to encourage the quality use of medicines.

    It is also part of our Institute’s more general program of research into consumer product information and the regulation of such information by government and industry.

    Among many things, this study led to the Australian Self Medication Industry (ASMI) medicines labelling code of practice.


  • cover_medicine_labelling_code_of_practice

    Australian Self Medication Industry (ASMI) Labelling code of practice for designing usable non-prescription medicine labels for consumers.

    This code was developed collaboratively by industry, government, consumer advocates, and CRI. It is a model of good practice that has been widely copied in other jurisdictions and industries.


  • cover_wamfp

    The definitive guidelines for writing, designing, and testing medicine information for consumers.

    This third edition has been updated, restructured as a reference tool to meet the needs of occasional and dedicated writers of medicine information for consumers. It contains new illustrations, worked examples, and an expanded module on testing with medicine users.

    If you would like to buy the cheaper ebook version, click here.

    Read sample pages.


  • Cover-Forms-of-Control

    Forms are used as one of the major instruments of communication between governments and citizens.
    CRI’s work and that of many others has focused largely on designing forms—making them easier for people to complete. But some of CRI’s most important early work focused on the how forms are controlled within organisations and how this control extends into the public domain.

    Read sample pages


  • Covere-usable-medicines-info copy

    Generalised principles and processes for designing usable labels and leaflets for medicine.
    Groundwork for CRI R&D on usable medicines information.


  • Cover-id-for-i-age

    This much-cited seminal paper is an edited version of a presentation by David Sless at the 1995 International Congress of Societies of Industrial Designers (ICSID), in Taipei.

    Sless looks at the role of information design, as information demand and supply escalate around the world.
    These insights are still relevant nearly twenty years later, and many have not yet been fully implemented.


  • cover-image
    see sample pages

    Report on the forum

    Edited by Erika Seymour

    For many years, CRI had been trying to persuade the Australian government to rethink its labelling regulations for pharmaceutical and food products; CRI’s research had shown that existing labelling regulations, far from helping the public, were in many cases a positive hindrance to the appropriate use of such products. Eventually, in November 1995, CRI had convinced the regulators that change was crucial, and organised an open forum on labelling regulations.

    The forum was attended by representatives from regulatory authorities, policy advisory organisations, pharmaceutical and food industries, consumer groups, legal advisers, and CRI. Each participant gave a positioning statement, from which key policy issues were extracted, discussed and elaborated in round table discussions. By the second day, we had reached sufficient consensus on policy to enable us to begin discussing the operational issues involved in implementing a totally different approach to labelling, called ‘performance-based labelling’, in the sectors concerned: pharmaceuticals, health appliances, food, agricultural chemicals and veterinary chemicals.

    At last, in 2004, government regulators and the pharmaceutical industry implemented performance-based labelling for over-the-counter medicines, with the full cooperation of all stakeholders.

    Other industries are yet to follow.


  • cover_theory_for_practice

    My job, as a researcher, is to develop theories that are useful to practitioners. In many fields there is a gap between theory and practice. I am determined that this should not be the case in information design.

    This ebook draws on the corpus of work undertaken at the Communication Research Institute (CRI),
    synthesising and making explicit the main theoretical notions which have developed out of CRI’s practical and research work since 1985.

    Click here to read a sample


  • boxed-warnings

    The research shows that boxed risk warnings don’t work, but there are alternatives that do.

    Read sample pages.


  • cover_id-overview

    An expert overview of the history, contemporary practice, methods and principles of information design.

    Read sample pages.


  • cover_wamfp

    The definitive guidelines for writing, designing, and testing medicine information for consumers.

    This third edition has been updated, restructured as a reference tool to meet the needs of occasional and dedicated writers of medicine information for consumers. It contains new illustrations, worked examples, and an expanded module on testing with medicine users.

    If you would like to buy the hardcopy, click here.

    Read sample pages.


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